Editorial: What about Amarillo?

What about Amarillo?

 

Perhaps it was just an oversight that Amarillo does not appear in a ranking of “2018’s Most & Least Ethnically Diverse Cities.”

The ranking was done by personal-finance website WalletHub (wallethub.com), which on a regular basis releases rankings on a wide array of topics, which is probably an understatement considering previous rankings ranked cities by auto maintenance quality.

The website compiled the “ethnically diverse” rankings “With immigration reform remaining one of the most prominent political issues, suggesting that the U.S. demographic landscape may soon change.”

Amarillo is already an example of that change.

As evidence, look at Amarillo Independent School District.

There are a multitude of languages spoken among AISD’s roughly 33,000 students at the district’s 55 schools.

If a school district is not a representation of a city, what is?

Speaking of websites and rankings, according to www.niche.com, AISD is the 21st “most diverse school district in Texas” out of 986 districts. AISD also ranks No. 241 in the same category nationally out of of 10,626 districts. AISD also received a grade of A+ in “diversity.”

The argument can be made that Tascosa High School is the prime example of the city’s diversity, in just about any category you want to use to judge diversity — race, ethnicity, economic advantages/disadvantages, etc.

For the record, Jersey City, N.J., was tops in the “ethnically diverse” ranking, followed by Gaithersburg, Md. Houston came in tops among Texas cities at No. 28, and 501 cities/towns were included, but hardly any in West Texas.

And as for immigration, here is an interesting number from the ranking — 17.8 percent of the population in the state of Texas came from a “foreign nation” in 2016.

Diversity in education does present challenges.

As mentioned, there are many languages spoken among the student body in AISD, and the language adjustment alone is a significant hurdle when it comes to learning — not to mention different cultural and societal norms.

Still, Amarillo is a diverse city, and this is a fact of which its residents should be proud.

More

Sun, 02/18/2018 - 18:42

Shame on Leal for political ad